Disney Post | Official Blog of the Walt Disney Company

Disney Post | Official Blog of the Walt Disney Company

April 15, 2014

Disney Named World's Most Reputable Company

By Cynthia Momdjian, The Walt Disney Company

Forbes recently reported that The Walt Disney Company ranked in the top spot of the World’s Most Reputable Companies—an annual list that is constructed by world-renowned private consulting firm Reputation Institute. Out of 130 companies evaluated, Disney and Google shared the No. 1 position this year.

The results were based on an online survey—conducted earlier this year—that interviewed more than 55,000 consumers across the 15 largest markets around the globe in order to measure the corporate reputation of some of the world’s most visible companies. Participants provided their insights on whether they trusted, respected, had good feelings about and admired the reputation of the companies identified in the study.

“Disney’s strength is its products,” Kasper Ulf Nielsen, executive partner and cofounder of Reputation Institute, shares in the Forbes article. “When you’re dealing with children and emotions, people assume you are also doing well for the citizenship at large. People’s perception is that Disney is a company that engages locally.” Our commitment to be among the most admired companies in the world guides our actions as a company and our efforts to promote the happiness and well-being of kids and families.

This honor follows similar recognitions from last year, when Disney topped the America’s Most Reputable Companies list, and was named one of the World’s Most Socially Responsible Companies, along with Microsoft, Google and BMW. Reputation Institute conducted both studies.

We’re extremely proud of this achievement as we continue to expand our library of world-class entertainment experiences and stories for families everywhere.

"Forbes" recently reported that The Walt Disney Company ranked in the top spot of the World’s Most Reputable Companies—an annual list that is constructed by world-renowned private consulting firm Reputation Institute.
April 14, 2014

An Overview of ESPN's Digital Media Associates Program for Young Professionals

By Sheldon Spencer, ESPN

ESPNCareers.com is the place to jumpstart your job search and find careers in a variety of fields at “The Worldwide Leader in Sports.” But if you’re specifically interested in the digital media industry, ESPN’s Digital Media Associates (DMA) program might be a perfect fit for your professional aspirations.

The highly competitive program offers participants a one-of-a-kind experience. Young professionals can roll up their sleeves and gain real-world exposure to ESPN’s digital and print platforms, including editorial, mobile, video, social and creative design. They will also gain a deep knowledge and understanding of ESPN’s diverse departments and organizations.

One of the most unique parts of the DMA program is that associates can work side by side with ESPN’s senior leaders, which gives them the opportunity to learn ESPN’s intricate storytelling and development process for fans around the world.

“Past and present DMA’s have helped shape the program into a personalized experience,” Joslyn Dalton, lead manager of the program, says. “The result is a win-win for ESPN and the candidate. Identifying immediate and specific departmental needs allows us to create a unique fit for each diversely talented associate. Positioning them at these intersections is what differentiates the program.”

To learn more about the DMA program or to apply, visit ESPN Front Row.

ESPN’s Digital Media Associates program participants gain real-world exposure to ESPN’s digital and print platforms, including editorial, mobile, video, social and creative design.
April 11, 2014

Disney News This Week: Disneynature's 'Monkey Kingdom,' CGI Ride-Through of 'Seven Dwarfs Mine Train' and 'Planes: Fire & Rescue' Trailer

By Cynthia Momdjian, The Walt Disney Company

Bears hits theaters on Friday, April 18, and Disneynature’s already getting ready for next year with the announcement of their latest film, Monkey Kingdom, this week. The story will spotlight the gripping reality of a newborn monkey and its mother struggling to survive within the competitive social hierarchy of the Temple Troop—a dynamic group of monkeys who live in ancient ruins found deep in the storied jungles of South Asia, alongside a rich cast of forest characters. Check out a sneak peek of Monkey Kingdom above.

On the East coast, Magic Kingdom is gearing up for the debut of Seven Dwarfs Mine Train. Hop aboard this brand-new CGI ride-through of the upcoming attraction, and visit the Disney Parks Blog for more information.

A new trailer for Planes: Fire & Rescue, this summer’s high-flying adventure from Disneytoon Studios, was released this week. World famous air racer Dusty Crophopper (voice of Dane Cook) returns in the film, along with a dynamic crew of elite firefighting aircraft devoted to protecting the historic Piston Peak National Park from a raging wildfire. Buckle up and get a preview of the upcoming film in the video above!

Disneynature's "Monkey Kingdom" hits theaters Earth Day 2015.
The Disney Parks Blog recently released a CGI ride-through of the "Seven Dwarf Mine Train" attraction at Magic Kingdom.
A new trailer for "Planes: Fire & Rescue," this summer’s high-flying adventure from Disneytoon Studios, was released this week.
April 9, 2014

Disney and The Nature Conservancy Encourage Kids to Spend Time in Nature

By Cynthia Momdjian, The Walt Disney Company

Running, biking, hiking and playing outdoors. All of these activities are simple, easy and fun—and they connect you and your family with nature.

At Disney, we believe that conserving nature begins with connecting to nature. Direct experience with the outdoors is the most highly cited influence on conservation values and inspires us to care about our planet.

The Nature Conservancy, with support from Disney, recently surveyed parents of children between the ages of three and 18 in the U.S., Brazil, China, France and Hong Kong on the topic of kids and nature. This is the first global survey to capture not only how much time kids spend outside, but also parents’ perspectives on how much importance they place on nature.

Take a closer look at the infographic below to see the results and learn how you can spend more time in the great outdoors. And if you’re looking ideas to have fun with your family in the backyard and beyond, visit NatureRocks.org.

This is the first global survey to capture not only how much time kids spend outside, but also parents’ perspectives on how much importance they place on nature.
Topics: Citizenship
April 8, 2014

An Inside Look at Disney Television Animation

By Nicole Balgemino, Disney/ABC Television Group

From the iconic whistle tune in Steamboat Willie to Fantasia’s magnificent score, music has always played a vital role in the story of Mickey Mouse. At Disney Television Animation (TVA), the musical team behind the award-winning Mickey Mouse cartoon shorts continues the tradition of musical storytelling in every comical episode.

Jay Stutler, vice president, Music; Paul Rudish, executive producer and supervising director; and composer Chris Willis recently sat down with Disney Post to talk about their roles and what it takes to develop the melodies and sounds of the laugh-out-loud cartoon series.

Describe your role in one sentence.
Jay Stutler (JS): My role is the creative oversight of all of the music for all of Disney TVA productions.

Chris Willis (CW): I write the music for the Mickey Mouse shorts.

Paul Rudish (PR): I’m the executive producer and supervising director for the Mickey Mouse shorts.

What is the process behind creating music for each episode of the Mickey Mouse shorts?
JS: Each episode involves two key sessions: spotting and preview. During a spotting session, we watch the episode with just dialogue, the completed animation and sound effects. Then we brainstorm what we want the episode to sound like. Chris then takes this discussion, and creates a musical story.

CW: At the preview session, I bring back samples generated from my computer, and we play them for Paul with the finished episode. We talk about what we can change or adjust, and once everything is approved, we record it with live musicians.

Many of the episodes take place in famous locales around the globe. How does that impact your research?
CW: The geography of each episode has a huge impact on the music we select. We start at the geographical location and take music from that part of the world, and listen to hours of music from that region. Sometimes we even read books about the culture to learn as much as we can within the week. One of the really tricky things is figuring out how to tell and deliver the story through cultural instruments. If I use a Chinese flute and three drums to place you in the setting of China, I have to also demonstrate the different emotions Mickey and the gang experience.

PR: We change location every episode and the stories are all so different; we always end up with a completely unique soundtrack for each one.

Why is music important to the Mickey Mouse shorts?
JS: There’s such a collaborative spirit to the Mickey Mouse shorts, but specifically with the music development as well. We come together on a bi-weekly basis, and waste no time with the music we can use. Every moment is important—you can hear Paul’s comments and see the detail that goes into Chris’ writing. Even one second makes a world of difference in music. And a lot of the storytelling is done through music. Chris’ role not only supports the dialogue in an episode, but sometimes allows music to take the lead in telling the story. He has the ability to thematically create melodies that become so integral to the storytelling.

PR: The episodes are short, and we want to make every second count as we share each story.  Someone like me, who can’t talk technically about music, can talk to a composer like Chris. We understand each other as it relates to the storytelling aspect. We also discuss the emotional content, message and point of the scene. Then we understand where we’re going and Chris can translate that into music.

Chris, what led you to your current role?
CW: I have an unusually classical music background for a film composer these days. If I didn’t, I don’t think I’d be able to write for these shorts. Often what we’re doing with these musical styles harks back 30, 40 and even 100 years for musical inspiration!

PR: Chris’ training and versatility are paramount to the music of the Mickey Mouse shorts.

Jay Stutler, vice president, Music; Paul Rudish, executive producer and supervising director; and composer Chris Willis recently sat down with Disney Post to talk about their roles and what it takes to develop the melodies and sounds of the laugh-out-loud cartoon series.
(L-R) Chris Willis and Paul Rudish collaborate to produce music for the "Mickey Mouse" shorts.

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