FY13 GRI Index

This Index follows G3.1 guidelines and includes sector specific media disclosures. The Global Reporting Initiative’s G3 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a comprehensive set of indicators covering the economic, environmental and ethical impacts of a company’s performance. These reporting principles have informed our reporting since 2008.

For fiscal year 2013, we have self-assessed ourselves as a B reporter according to GRI-defined application levels.

Background on the GRI

The GRI Reporting Framework is intended to serve as a generally accepted framework for reporting on an organization’s economic, environmental, and social performance. It is designed for use by organizations of any size, sector, or location. It takes into account the practical considerations faced by a diverse range of organizations – from small enterprises to those with extensive and geographically dispersed operations. The GRI Reporting Framework contains general and sector-specific content that has been agreed upon by a wide range of stakeholders around the world to be generally applicable for reporting an organization’s sustainability performance.1

GRI Reporting Level Symbol Explanation
Full Reported Information is fully reported with respect to
available information and current reporting systems
Partially Reported Information is partially reported with respect to
available information and current reporting systems
Not Reported Information is not reported due to lack of access
to data, materiality or applicability
  Disclosure Status Location/Direct Answer
1. Strategy and Analysis 
1.1 Statement from the most senior decision maker

 Location:

 Message From Our CEO p. 4

 Message From Our CFO p. 5

1.2 Description of key impacts, risks, and opportunities  
Location:
CEO & CFO letters (p. 4, 5), Stakeholder Feedback p.15, Looking Ahead, Form 10-K (p. 17-22) 
2.  Organizational Profile 
2.1 Name of the organization Location:
Disney's Citizenship Commitment (p. 6)
2.2 Primary brands, products, and/or services  

Location:
Form 10-K (p. 1-17)

2.3 Operational structure   Location:
Form 10-K (p. 1-17)
2.4 Location of organization’s headquarters Direct Answer:
500 S. Buena Vista St., Burbank, CA 91521 USA
2.5 Countries in operation   Location:
Form 10-K (p. 1-17,22), Disney Around The World (web)
2.6  Nature of ownership

Location:
Form 10-K (p. 1-17)

Additional Information:
We are a widely publicly-owned company with diverse shareholders.

2.7  Markets served
 

Location:
Form 10-K (p. 1-17)

Additional Information:
In our Form 10-K, we provide information about the markets we serve by business segment.

2.8 Scale of the organization
 

Location:
About This Report (p. 14), Form 10-K (p. 1-17)

Additional Information:
In our Form 10-K, we break down our revenues by source; the breakdown of circulation of audience figures is not applicable to The Walt Disney Company as a whole.

2.9 Significant changes regarding size, structure, or ownership  

Location:
Form 10-K (p. 1-17)

2.10 Awards received  

 Recognition:

Awards:

3. Report Parameters  
Report profile  
3.1 Reporting period   Additional Information:
The policies, programs, and performance data presented in this report are for the Company’s 2013 fiscal year, ended September 28, 2013, unless otherwise noted. Instances where information is relevant only to a single or a few segments, or has a different time frame than the fiscal year, will be distinguished.
3.2 Date of most recent previous report

Additional Information:
Our most recent reports include a 2010 Corporate Citizenship Report, a 2011 Data Update, and the 2011 performance information in the 2012 Citizenship Targets document.

Download additional and past reports at our Report Archive. Please also visit our citizenship website throughout the year for ongoing updates.

3.3 Reporting cycle   Direct Answer:
We report performance on targets on an annual basis.
3.4 Contact point for questions   Location:
Contact UsCorporate Citizenship website
3.5 Process for defining report content  

Additional Information:

We look to the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) for guidance on specific reporting principals regarding content, quality, and report boundaries. We have taken measures to address the Media Sector Supplement in the GRI 3.1 guidelies. However, not all of the guidelines are applicable or appropriate to our business, and we have applied them flexibly. 

This report was developed through the lens of several considerations, including issue importance, stakeholder inclusiveness, sustainability context, completeness, blanace, comparability, accuracy, timeliness, reliability, and clarity. 

Performance data are presented throughout the report. Where relevant, we provide details on scale, scope and collection methodology. Using the GRI guidelines for accuracy, we believe thed ata we prsent are sufficiently detailed to allow for clear understanding of our disclosures. We take care to explain key estimates or assumptions that are used in the development of metrics. 

This report represents our best effort to accurately depict our impact, progress, and results as they relate to corporate citizenship. There are some cases where we have relied on estimates to communicate results. These areas are identified in the report. 

3.6 Boundary of the report   Additional Information:
Our report covers The Walt Disney Company and its affiliated companies. We specifically notate instances in which the scope is different.
3.7 Limitations on the scope or boundary of the report  

Location:
About This Report (p. 14)

Additional Information:
This report is focused on our performance against our citizenship targets. As a result, this report does not address everything we do, have done or will do, but represents many important areas of ongoing priority and focus.

3.8 Joint ventures, subsidiaries, leased facilities, outsourced operations and other entities   Location:
See footnotes of specific charts and tables for relevant information in this report.
3.9 Data measurement techniques

Location:
See footnotes of specific charts and tables for relevant information in this report.

Additional Information:

We document the definition of each target and the processes and procedures related to the collection of data with respect to each target. In addition, as appropriate, we look to the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) for guidance on reporting principles and guidelines for accuracy to allow for a clear understanding of our disclosures.

Documenting the components of each target benefits us in two ways:

• Internally, we will have consistent, comparable reported performance against each target as a result of the agreed upon target definitions, data requirements and performance tracking methodology

• Externally, third-party stakeholders will have a clear definition of each target and understanding of our disclosures through the use of common GRI terminology

 

We are committed to the continued improvement, accuracy, and sophistication of our citizenship reporting. To this end, we have transitioned the data collection and validation of citizenship data to our corporate reporting function; the same function that manages the Company’s financial data.

3.10 Effect of any restatements of information provided in earlier reports Location:
See footnotes of specific charts and tables for relevant information in this report.
3.11 Significant changes in the scope, boundary,
or measurement methods
Location:
See footnotes of specific charts and tables for relevant information in this report.
3.12 GRI Content Index   Location:
GRI Index
3.13 External assurance  

Location:
Response to indicator 3.9 (p. 105)

Additional Information:
With a goal of transparency and accuracy, we expect process of data collection to evolve as we refine our approach. In addition, we will consider external verification in the future as a way to enhance assurances regarding the validity of the report's contents.  

4. Governance, Commitments and Engagement   
4.1 Governance structure Location:
Corporate Governance Website, Form 10-K (p. 24-58), Proxy Statement (p. 9-15)


4.2
Indicate whether chairperson is also an executive officer
Location:
Proxy Statement (p. 9-10)
4.3 Board structure Location:
Proxy Statement (p. 9-14)
4.4 Mechanisms for shareholders and
employees to provide recommendations
to the highest governance body
Location:
Proxy Statement (p. 14), Corporate Governance Website
4.5 Linkage between compensation for
members of the Board, senior managers, and executives, and the organization’s performance
Location:
Proxy Statement (p. 16-49)
4.6 Processes to avoid conflicts of interest
at the Board
Location:
Corporate Governance Website, Standards of Business Conduct (p. 18-20)
4.7 Expertise of Board members on sustainability topics (including gender and diversity aspects) Location:
Corporate Governance Website
4.8 Statements of mission, codes of conduct, and principles

Location:
Citizenship at Disney (p. 6-9), Smoking in Film (p. 53), Standards of Business Conduct (p. 44-45), Code of Conduct for ManufacturersPolicies and Approaches (web), Friends for Change 

Additional Information:
Throughout the report, we detail the different principles and guidelines that frame our approach to corporate citizenship.

In addition, all of our broadcast and cable properties have internal codes of conduct and standards and practices to ensure that the content we create reflects our citizenship values. These standards and practices cover guidance and rules around the depiction of themes and issues such as diversity, animals, healthy living, drugs, smoking, and alcohol and many others.

4.9 Procedures of the Board for overseeing the organization’s management of sustainability performance  

Location:

Our Citizenship Commitments p. 6

Direct Answer:
Citizenship efforts at Disney are led by President and Chief Executive Officer Bob Iger and Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Jay Rasulo. The Company’s Citizenship group is led by Senior Vice President, Corporate Citizenship Leslie Goodman. Our organizational structure, reporting to the CFO, reinforces our belief that corporate citizenship is central to the business and brings long-term value to our shareholders.

Certain areas of the citizenship function – including community engagement, strategic philanthropy, environment and conservation, and international labor standards – have dedicated staff developing strategy, managing compliance and overseeing stakeholder engagement. In addition, an insights and integration team reporting to the Senior Vice President, Corporate Citizenship manages reporting, commitments, and metrics, and analyzes emerging issues, trends, and policy for the Company.

Citizenship efforts and performance are reported to the Disney Board of Directors on a periodic basis, with additional updates upon request or when business needs require it. Additionally, the Audit Committee of the Board regularly receives reports on the Company’s International Labor Standards program.

Our executives and business unit leaders are committed to the highest level of corporate citizenship. Many executives serve on internal councils that advise the Company on corporate citizenship. For example, the Environmental Council, established in 2007, was comprised of senior representatives from across our many businesses with responsibility for meeting our environmental goals. A newly formed Citizenship Council met for the first time in 2012 and plans to continue to meet on a quarterly basis. These councils oversee operations and provide guidance, policy, and strategy to citizenship efforts.

Employees throughout the Company also share their professional and personal time to guide the Company’s citizenship activities. Globally, more than 110 cast members and employees serve as Green Team leaders. VoluntEARS Leadership Councils, involving approximately 180 cast members and employees, provide advice and guidance to local Disney volunteer efforts.

4.10 Process of evaluating the Board’s
sustainability performance
Location:
Corporate Governance Website

Additional Information:
See indicator 4.5 and 4.9 for additional information.

4.11 Process of evaluating the Board’s
sustainability performance
Location:
Environmental Stewardship

Additional Information:
One of our key citizenship priorities is to act and create in an ethical manner and consider the consequences of our decisions on people and the planet.

4.12 External charters, principles,
or other initiatives
Location:
Environmental Stewardship (p. 58), Ethical Sourcing

Additional Information:
In our report we, detail relationships with external initiatives, principles, and codes. These include, but are not limited to, the World Resources Institutes GHG Protocol and core conventions of the International Labor Organization (ILO), among others.

4.13 Memberships in associations   Location:
Ethical Sourcing, Disney Citizenship

Additional Information:
Our membership in associations or national/international advocacy organizations includes, but is not limited to, the following: American Red Cross, Audubon Society, BSR, Ceres, Corporate EcoForum, International Conservation Caucus Foundation, International Association of Volunteer Efforts/Global Corporate Volunteer Council, Net Impact, Sustainability 50, Sustainability Consortium, SustainAbility, and others.

In our report and on our website, we also describe our membership in a number of associations and national/international advocacy organizations.

4.14 Stakeholder groups   Location:
Stakeholder Table (p. 15), Disney Citizenship (web)

Additional Information:
We believe that working with external stakeholders enhances our ability to address issues and contributes solutions to some of our most important challenges. We engage with stakeholders routinely and in a variety of ways, including in-person and web-based meetings, conference calls, correspondence, working groups and workshops, conferences, and events.

In addition to the stakeholder engagement table in our report, we detail engagements with various stakeholder groups throughout the report.

4.15 Stakeholder identification
and selection
Location:
Civic Engagement (p. 68), Stakeholder Feedback (p. 15)
4.16 Approaches to stakeholder engagement Location:
Civic Engagement (p. 68), Stakeholder Feedback (p. 15)
4.17 Topics and concerns raised by stakeholders   Location:
Civic Engagement (p. 68), Stakeholder Feedback (p. 15)
5. Economic Performance Indicators  
Economic Performance  
DMA Management Approach
Disclosures: Economic

Location:
Form 10-K (p. 1-38)

Additional Information:
Our Form 10-K outlines our Management Approach Disclosures on Economic Performance

EC1 Direct economic value generated and distribute 

Location:
Form 10-K (p. 27-38)

Additional Information:

Our Form 10-K outlines our Management Approach Disclosures on Economic Performance 

EC2 Financial implications due to climate change   Location:
Form 10-K (p. 19)
EC3 Coverage of the organization’s defined
benefit plan
  Location:
Form 10-K (p. 20, 38)
EC4 Financial assistance from government   Direct Answer:
We do not receive financial assistance from the governments of any countries with operations material to our media business.
M1 Significant funding and other support received from nongovernmental
sources
Direct Answer:
We do not receive more than 10% of revenue from any one individual source.
Market Presence   
EC5 Standard entry-level wage by gender
compared to local minimum wage
 
EC6 Locally-based suppliers    
EC7 Local hiring    
Indirect Economic Impacts  
EC8 Infrastructure investments and
services for public benefit
Location:
Strategic Philanthropy (p. 10), Inspire Action target (p. 37), Volunteerism targets (p. 38), Children in Need target (p. 39)

Additional Information:
Strengthen communities section and targets note examples of infrastructure investments and services provided primarily for public benefit, such as volunteer hours, PSAs, play spaces built, etc.

EC9 Indirect economic impacts  
6. Environment Performance Indicators
DMA Management Approach
Disclosures: Environmental
Location:
Emissions (p. 59-62), Electricity (p. 61), Waste (p. 63), Ecosystems (p. 67), Water (p. 65), Product Footprint (p. 67), Paper (p. 85), ERI target (p. 84), Environmental Stewardship (web), Environmental Policy (web), Disney's Environmental Stewardship Goals and Targets (web)

Additional Information:
We are working to reduce our environmental impact through projects big and small. From reducing our electricity consumption to investing in reforestation around the world, we are working to help protect the planet for future generations.

Materials
EN1 Materials used by weight or volume Location:
Paper targets (p. 85)

Additional Information:
We introduced our Paper Policy in October 2012. The paper policy focuses on the responsible sourcing and responsible use of paper in our day-to-day operations. This policy will help us better understand the amount and source of paper used throughout the company.

EN2 Recycled input materials Location:
Waste targets (p. 63), Ecosystems targets (p. 67), Product Footprint targets (p. 67)

Additional Information:
In addition to discussion of different initiatives throughout the Company to integrate recycled materials into Disney products, our wood policy, paper policy, and product footprint targets integrate goals around recycled materials. However, due to the diversity of our businesses, we do not provide an enterprise-wide breakdown on the percentage of materials used that are recycled input materials.

EN3 Direct primary energy
consumption
Location:
Emissions and Electricity targets (p. 59-62), Environmental Stewardship
EN4 Indirect primary energy consumption Location:
Emissions and Electricity targets (p. 59-62), Environmental Stewardship
EN5 Energy savings Location:
Emissions and Electricity targets (p. 59-62), Environmental Stewardship
EN6 Initiatives for energy efficiency and
renewable energy
Location:
Emissions and Electricity targets (p. 59-62), Environmental Stewardship
EN7 Initiatives to reduce indirect energy consumption

Location:
Emissions and Electricity targets (p. 59-62)

Additional Information:
The Walt Disney Company – Travel Policy – Ground Transportation While on Business Trip

When commuting while on a business trip, employees must choose one of the following alternatives:

  • Mass transit or shuttle service
  • Carpool or public taxi
  • Hybrid or low-emission rental or town car service, from an approved vendor, when available and cost-effective, otherwise a standard car rental

Disney Clean Fleet Employee Shuttles
Disney provides a shuttle service for employees of the greater Glendale and Burbank area. The shuttles make a round trip loop around major sites including the Glendale Creative Campus, Studio Lot, and offices near Brand and Central Boulevards in Glendale. The shuttle operates on Compressed Natural Gas and also has bike racks for bicycle commuters. These shuttles help employees attend off-site business meetings without needing a vehicle to make the trip. With over 1,000 boardings per month, the shuttles help to reduce parking, congestion, and emissions in and around these Disney sites.

EN8 Total water withdrawal Related Information:
Environmental Stewardship (web), Environmental Stewardship (p. 58)


EN9 Effect of water withdrawal Related Information:
Environmental Stewardship (web), Environmental Stewardship (p. 58)

 

EN10 Water recycled and reused Related Information:
Environmental Stewardship (web), Environmental Stewardship (p. 58)
EN11 Land assets in or adjacent to
protected areas
Location:
DWCF target (p. 43)
EN12 Impacts on biodiversity Location:
Ecosystems (p. 67), DWCF target (p. 43), Paper Policy
EN13 Habitats protected or restored Location:
DWCF target (p. 43), Environmental Stewardship (web)
EN14 Strategies for biodiversity Location:
DWCF target (p. 43), Environmental Stewardship (web)
EN15 Endangered species Location:
DWCF target (p. 43), Environmental Stewardship (web) 
EN16 Greenhouse gas emissions Location:
Emissions and Electricity target (p. 59-62)

Additional Information:
MTCO2eq                               2013
Direct GHG Emissions           915,764
Indirect GHG Emissions         764,625
Total GHG Emissions            1,680,38920

EN17 Other greenhouse gas emissions

Related Information:
Emissions and Electricity target (p. 59-62)

Additional Information:
Our performance on our emissions targets provides description of initiatives that help to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions.

EN18 Initiatives to reduce
greenhouse gas emissions
Location:
Emissions and Electricity targets(p. 59-62), Paper Policy target (p. 85),  Environmental Stewardship (web)
EN19 Ozone-depleting substances  
EN20 NOx, SOx, and other air emissions  
EN21 Water discharge  
EN22 Weight of waste Location:
WDP&R Waste target (p. 63-64), ESPN Waste target (p. 64)

Additional Information:
Our ABC Studios has established an innovative set recycling and rental program. This program has helped divert waste from the landfill while generating revenue by renting set materials to others in the entertainment industry. ABC Studios Production Services is committed to minimizing its overall impact on the environment while encouraging and activating green initiatives and environmental standards of operation.

EN23 Significant spills  
EN24 Waste deemed hazardous under the
terms of the Basel Convention
 
EN25 Impacts of discharges of water and runoff on biodiversity  
EN26 Initiatives to mitigate
environmental impact

Location:
Paper targets (p. 86)

Additional Information:
In addition to business-specific initiatives, we established companywide goals for sustainable paper and manufacturing.

EN27 Packaging materials  
EN28 Sanctions for non-compliance with environmental regulations  
EN29 Environmental impacts of transport   Additional Information:
Disney and its affiliates in the United States joined the SmartWay EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) program in 2009. The intent of this effort is to collaborate and identify effective action plans to help minimize carbon emissions from transportation. Many domestic carriers used by Disney are SmartWay Partners. We regularly review optimal transportation modes, such as rail and ocean, which will reduce our carbon footprint.
EN30 Environmental protection expenditures   Location:
DWCF target (p. 43), Environmental Stewardship (web)
7. Labor Practices and Decent Work
DMA Management Approach Disclosures: Labor Practices Location:
Respectful Workplaces (web), Form 10-K (p. 1-22)
Employment
LA1 Workforce by employment type,
contract, region, and gender

Location:
Diversity (p. 73), 2013 Data Table (p. 26-27)

Additional Information:
Employees by Employment Status (Global)2

Status                          2013
Full-Time                      111,843
Part-Time                       30,837
Temporary/Seasonal    16,721
All Employees              159,401

LA2 Employee hires and turnover by age
group, gender, and region
 
LA3 Benefits provided to
full-time employees
Location:
Disney Workplace (web)
Labor/Management Relations
LA4 Employees with collective bargaining agreements Location:
Form 10-K (p. 21)
LA5 Minimum notice period regarding significant operational changes  
Occupational Health and Safety
LA6 Workforce represented in joint health and safety committees  
LA7 Rates of injury, occupational diseases,
lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities
 
LA8 Training on serious diseases Location:
Employee Health target (p. 74-75)
LA9 Health and safety topics covered in
formal agreements with trade unions
 
Labor/Management Relations
LA10 Training per employee per gender Location:
Diversity (p. 72), 2013 Citizenship Data table (p. 26-27)

Additional Information:
We do not average our training hours by employee. We provide number of participants and total number of training hours taken.

LA11 Programs for skills management and lifelong learning Location:
Career Development (p. 75), Disney Careers (web)
LA12 Regular performance and career development reviews, by gender Location:
Career Development (p. 73)

Additional Information:
93% of eligible staff participated in our Performance Connection performance management tool. Eligible employees only include salaried employees

Diversity and Equal Opportunity
LA13 Composition of governance bodies Location:
Diversity (p. 73)
LA14 Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men  
8. Human Rights  
DMA Management Approach Disclosures: Human rights Location:
Cultural Diversity (p. 56), Minimum Compliance Standard: Remediation and Termination (p. 79), Human Rights Policy (web), Standards of Business Conduct (p. 13), Form 10-K (p. 17-22), Disney Privacy PolicyCode of Conduct for Manufacturers

Additional Information:
Disclosures regarding HR1, HR2, HR3, HR4, HR6, HR7, and HR11 apply to the management and oversight of labor rights concerns within The Walt Disney Company’s consumer products business. The International Labor Standards (ILS) Program oversees labor rights issues as they pertain to Disney’s supply chain producing Disney-branded consumer products; therefore, our responses to these indicators address our policies, programs, and outcomes within those parameters

Investment and Procurement Practices
HR1 Investment agreements that include clauses incorporating human rights concerns Location:
ILS targets (p. 94), Minimm Compliance Standards: Remediation and Termination (p. 79), International Labor Standards (web)

Additional Information:

Significant Investment – All licensing agreements between The Walt Disney Company and our licensees qualify as significant investments for the purposes of the ILS Program due to the centrality of these agreements to our consumer products business.

Human Rights Clause/Screening – For the purposes of the ILS Program, a human rights clause/screening is defined as a measure of a licensee’s compliance with our sourcing requirements. Licensing agreements contain clauses (quoted below) stipulating compliance with the ILS Program’s requirements. These agreements are then subject to periodic assessments of compliance, thereby incorporating both a clause and screening element.

Our sourcing requirements, to which licensees are contractually bound, require that:

Licensees shall use only Facilities that comply with at least the ILS Minimum Compliance Standards (except during a period of remediation), and shall ensure that such Facilities fully comply with the Code to the extent it is commercially reasonable.

Therefore, 100% of significant investment agreements include human rights clauses/screenings.

HR2 Human rights screening of suppliers, contractors, and other business partners

Location:
ILS targets (p. 76-82)

Additional Information:
Significant Investment – All licensing agreements between The Walt Disney Company and our licensees qualify as significant investments for the purposes of the ILS Program due to the centrality of these agreements to our consumer products business.

Human Rights Clause/Screening – For the purposes of the ILS Program, a human rights clause/screening is defined as a measure of a licensee’s compliance with our sourcing requirements. Licensing agreements contain clauses (quoted below) stipulating compliance with the ILS Program’s requirements. These agreements are then subject to periodic assessments of compliance, thereby incorporating both a clause and screening element.

Suppliers and contractors – Classified as vendors by Disney. 100% of Disney suppliers and contractors undergo human rights screenings through contractually obligated compliance with ILS Program requirements, as outlined in HR1. Furthermore, Disney conducts audits of vendor facilities in order to measure compliance to Disney’s labor standards.

HR3 Training on human rights   Location:
ILS targets (p.76-82)


Non-discrimination
HR4 Incidents of discrimination   Location:
2013 Data Table (p. 26-27)
Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining
HR5 Freedom of association and collective bargaining   Location:
2013 Data Table (p. 26-27)

Additional Information:
We report on the percentage of facilities in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at significant risk but do not identify the operations in additional detail.

Child Labor
HR6 Child labor   Location:
2013 Data Table (p. 26-27), Minimum Compliance Standard: Remediation and Termination (p. 79), International Labor StandardsPolicy on Uzbek cotton

Additional Information:
Child labor is a Minimum Compliance Standard (MCS) violation, and therefore requires immediate corrective action to address the noncompliance. Facilities with MCS violations are not permitted to produce Disney-branded products. Furthermore, Disney has participated in a pilot effort in China to remedy child labor when found.

Forced and Compulsory Labor   
HR7 Forced labor Location:
2013 Data Table(p. 26-27), Policy on Uzbek cottonStatement on Forced Labor and Human Trafficking

Additional Information:

Involuntary labor is a Minimum Compliance Standard (MCS) violation, and therefore requires immediate corrective action to address the noncompliance.
Security Practices
HR8 Training for security personnel  
Indigenous Rights
HR9 Violations of rights of indigenous people  
HR10 Human rights reviews and/or impact assessments Location:
2013 Data Table (p. 26-27)

Additional Information:
We report that we conducted a human rights review but do not report on the percentage and total number of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews and/or impact assessments.

HR11 Grievances related to human rights filed, addressed, and resolved through formal grievance mechanisms Location:
Ethical Sourcing

Additional Information:
Disney addresses allegations from media and NGOs about labor rights conditions through a standard operating procedure, which involves increased oversight and remediation at the facility level where allegations are confirmed. Disney reports on these allegations on the International Labor Standards website, here. Furthermore, Disney, through a third-party civil society organization (CSO), has maintained since 2005 a worker helpline at select factories in China that allows factory workers to report labor rights violations directly. Disney, other buyers, and the factories work together to develop strategies to remedy these concerns.

9. Product Responsibility
DMA Management Approach Disclosure: Product responsibility Location:
Responsible Marketing target (p. 55), Food Safety target (p. 85), Safety targets (p. 56-57; p. 85), Nutrition Guidelines targets (p. 53-54), Standards of Business Conduct (p. 5), Disney Privacy PolicyCode of Conduct for Manufacturers
M2 Methodology for assessing and monitoring adherence to content creation values Location:
Age-appropriate Entertainment Experiences for Kids (p. 55), Promote Safety for Kids (p. 58)

Additional Information:

Our values are embedded in each of our consumer-facing brands. For each brand, we have a defined brand promise, and all businesses creating content for that brand must adhere to the standards of each brand. When outside companies (e.g., film production companies) create for our brands, they are also required to deliver against these standards, and we have contractual control to ensure such delivery. Specific businesses, notably television, also have content standards and practices.
M3 Actions taken to improve adherence to content creation values Additional Information:
See response to M2.
M4 Actions taken to improve performance in relation to content dissemination issues Location:
Online Safety target (p. 54), Disney online safety: kids (web), Disney Privacy Policy (web)

Additional Information:
We conduct regular reviews of our guidelines in relation to responsible marketing practices to ensure that we keep abreast of critical issues (e.g. new technology that allows our guests to interact with us in new ways) Internally, we also actively raise awareness of the guidelines and the need for compliance.

M5 Number and nature of responses related to content dissemination Location:
Disney online safety: kids (web), Disney Privacy Policy (web)

Additional Information:
Feedback can take many forms: letters, emails, social media, etc. We view feedback as a key means of informing us of what we are doing right and what we are doing wrong. All formal complaints receive some form of acknowledgment and response, especially if it is related to younger audiences.

M6 Methods to interact with audiences and results  

Additional Information:
Our relationship with our audiences is key to our success; we do our utmost to make sure we are listening to the interests and concerns of our audiences. We interact with audiences in multiple ways ranging from direct feedback (focus groups, user panels, quantitative questionnaire studies) to indirect feedback from social media, consumer reviews, critical reviews, etc.

 

 

PR1 Health and safety impacts along life cycle   Location:
Product Footprint (p. 67), ERI target (p.84)

Additional Information:
We do not report on the percentage of significant products and services categories subject to life cycle stage impact assessments.

PR2 Noncompliance with health and safety
standards and regulations
  Direct Answer:
We track incidents of noncompliance by our vendors and licensees, but do not itemize them here
Product and Service Labeling
PR3 Product information   Location:
Paper Policy (web)
PR4 Noncompliance with product and
service information standards
   
PR5 Customer satisfaction Direct Answer:
The guest relations/services of our consumer products group prepares a weekly “Voice of the Guest” for executives. This report is a compilation of several different surveys and monitoring activity, including: exit surveys from the disneystore.com website, post-purchase surveys, product ratings by consumers, and secret shopper – both online and in-store. Additionally, ad hoc guest comments are monitored and reported from emails, blogs, etc.
Product and Service Labeling
PR6 Fundraising and marketing
communications standards
  Location:
Responsible Marketing target (p. 52), Healthy Living targets (p. 33-34)
PR7 Noncompliance with marketing
communications standards
Location:
Parental Input (p. 57), Responsible Marketing for Kids (p. 52), Healthy Living targets (p. 33-34)

Additional Information:

Due to the low number of known breaches of regulations and voluntary codes, we do not currently have a means of auditing the total number of incidents and outcomes.
M7 Actions taken to empower audiences
through media literacy skills development and results obtained
Location:
Online Safety target (p. 45), Creativity target (p. 19), Recognize Kids target (p. 40), Cultural Relevancy target (p. 47)
Customer Privacy
PR8 Complaints regarding customer privacy Location:
Privacy Policy (web), Standards of Business Conduct

Compliance
PR9 Sanctions for noncompliance with
regulations concerning the provision
and use of products and services
   
10. Society  
Community  
DMA Management Approach
Disclosure: Society
Location:
Participation in the Formulation of Public Policy, Standards of Business Conduct
SO1 Implemented local community
engagement, impact assessments,
and development programs
Location:
Strengthen Communities (p. 36)
Corruption  
SO2 Programs/business units analyzed for risks related to corruption Additional Information:
While we do not report the percentage and total number of business units, we analyze where we have material risks to our business for corruption.
SO3 Anti-corruption training   Location:
Standards of Business Conduct (p. 37)


Additional Information:
We do not report on the percentage of employees training in anti-corruption policies and procedures, but further information on our anti-corruption policies and procedures are outlined in our Standards of Business Conduct expected to be followed by all employees

 

 

SO4 Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption    
Public Policy  
SO5 Public policy positions and lobbying   Location:
Participation in the Formulation of Public Policy
SO6 Contributions to political parties,
politicians, and related institutions
 

Location:
Participation in the Formulation of Public Policy, Form 10-K 

Additional Information:
Information regarding the contributions made by the political action committee in calendar year 2013 is available here

Information regarding the contributions we made in calendar 2013 (other than through our political action committee) is available here.

Anti-Competitive Behavior  
SO7 Legal actions for anticompetitive
behavior, antitrust,
and monopoly practices
 
Compliance  
SO8 Sanctions for noncompliance with regulations

  1. GRI Reporting Framework text is from the G3.1 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines (www.globalreporting.org).
  2. This number includes temp/seasonal employees.